The Trust

Macclesfield Pain Management Service

The Acute Pain Service is based in the hospital and provides safe and effective pain management to patients whilst they are in hospital primarily after surgery.

The Acute Pain Team/Service
The primary role of the Acute Pain Team is to provide safe and effective pain management to patients undergoing surgery. The service is led by a consultant anaesthetist and run by nurses on a day to day basis.
If you have had major surgery one of the acute pain nurses will visit you to make sure that your pain is controlled effectively. Our aim is to provide good postoperative pain control with minimal side effects to help speed your recovery after surgery.

Acute Pain Team/Service- departmental objectives

  • To ensure all patients have access to safe and effective pain management from admission to discharge.
  • To provide specialist pain management advice and clinical support to staff on how best to manage your postoperative pain.
  • Provide education and clinical support to doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals to improve their pain management knowledge.
  • We use various ways to control postoperative pain ranging from medicine and tablets and injections to using computerised pumps to deliver pain relieving drugs.
  1. Oral analgesics – this is the simplest way of taking pain killers. The tablets or medicine will vary in type and form and will be given at regular intervals throughout the day. You should let your nurse know if you need extra analgesia before the next tablet/medicine is due.
  2. Intramuscular/subcutaneous injections – this involves a nurse giving you an injection about every 3-4 hours. It is a common method of pain control after surgery. You should let your nurse know if your pain returns before the next injection is due as the dose or interval may need adjusting.
  3. Rectus Sheath Infusions – this involves a small plastic tube being placed into your abdomen. The tube is connected to a pump. The pump is programmed to give you a set rate of pain killing medication (local anaesthetic) to keep your pain controlled.
  4. Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia – this allows you to demand small amounts of pain relieving medication by pressing a button on a handset, which is attached to a pump. The pump is programmed so that you get the right amount of pain killer, but you are not in danger of having too much pain relieving medication.
  5. Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia – this involves a small plastic tube being placed in your back close to the spinal cord. The tube is connected to a pump. The pump is programmed to give you a set rate of drugs every hour. If you experience extra pain you will also be able to demand a small amount of extra drugs by pressing the button on a handset. The pump is programmed so that you cannot overdose.

 

Pain Management Contacts:

Acute Pain Team
Dr Mick Rothwell (Acute Pain Service - Consultant Anaesthetist)
Tel: 01625 661307
email: Mick.Rothwell@echeshire-tr.nwest.nhs.uk

Dot Pearson Acute Pain Practitioner
Tel: 01625 661739
email: dpearson@nhs.net

Janet Hatton (Acute Pain Practitioner)
Tel: 01625 661739
email: janet.hatton1@nhs.net

 

 

 

 

 

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